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Addict Behav. 2014 May;39(5):941-4. doi: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2013.12.003. Epub 2013 Dec 11.

Combinations of prescription drug misuse and illicit drugs among young adults.

Author information

1
Purdue University, Dept. of Sociology, 700 W State Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907, United States; Center for HIV Educational Studies & Training, 142 West 36th Street, 9th Floor New York, NY 10018, United States. Electronic address: bckelly@purdue.edu.
2
Center for HIV Educational Studies & Training, 142 West 36th Street, 9th Floor New York, NY 10018, United States; Hunter College, City University of New York, Dept. of Psychology, 695 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10065, United States.
3
Center for HIV Educational Studies & Training, 142 West 36th Street, 9th Floor New York, NY 10018, United States; The Graduate Center, City University of New York, 365 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10016, United States.
4
Center for HIV Educational Studies & Training, 142 West 36th Street, 9th Floor New York, NY 10018, United States.
5
Center for HIV Educational Studies & Training, 142 West 36th Street, 9th Floor New York, NY 10018, United States; Hunter College, City University of New York, Dept. of Psychology, 695 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10065, United States; The Graduate Center, City University of New York, 365 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10016, United States.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Prescription drug misuse remains a critical drug trend. Data indicate that young adults in nightlife scenes misuse prescription drugs at high rates. As such, continued surveillance of the patterns of prescription drug misuse among young adults is necessary, particularly assessments that spotlight specific areas of risk, such as polydrug use.

METHODS:

Prevalence and correlates of recent combinations of prescription drugs and other substances among urban young adults recruited at nightlife venues using time-space sampling are assessed via prevalence estimates and logistic regression analyses.

RESULTS:

Overall, 16.4% of the sample reported combining illicit drug use with prescription drug misuse. Of those who reported any prescription drug misuse, 65.9% used prescription drugs in combination with at least one of the illicit drugs assessed. The most common combination was marijuana, followed by alcohol, cocaine, ecstasy, and psychedelics. Being male and identifying as gay, lesbian, or bisexual predicted the combination of prescription drugs with ecstasy, cocaine, and psychedelics.

CONCLUSIONS:

Rates of combining alcohol and illicit drug use with prescription drug misuse were high, especially among men and those identified as a sexual minority. These rates are alarming in light of the host of negative health outcomes associated with combining prescription and illicit drugs.

KEYWORDS:

Nightlife; Polydrug use; Prescription drugs; Young adults

PMID:
24462348
PMCID:
PMC3980000
DOI:
10.1016/j.addbeh.2013.12.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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