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Am J Med. 2014 Feb;127(2):152-7. doi: 10.1016/j.amjmed.2013.10.012. Epub 2013 Nov 1.

Identification of cardiometabolic risk: visceral adiposity index versus triglyceride/HDL cholesterol ratio.

Author information

1
Hospital Universitario General San Martín, La Plata, Buenos Aires, Argentina. Electronic address: salazarlandea@gmail.com.
2
Hospital Universitario General San Martín, La Plata, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
3
Hospital Municipal de Rauch, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
4
Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, Calif.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The plasma concentration ratio of triglyceride (TG)/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) can identify cardiometabolic risk and cardiovascular disease. The visceral adiposity index is a sex-specific index, in which measurements of body mass index and waist circumference are combined with TG and HDL-C concentrations. The current analysis was initiated to see if the visceral adiposity index would improve the ability of the TG/HDL-C to identify increased cardiometabolic risk and outcome.

METHODS:

Cardiometabolic data were obtained in 2003 from 926 apparently healthy individuals, 796 of whom were evaluated in 2012 for evidence of incident cardiovascular disease. The relationship between TG/HDL-C and values for visceral adiposity index was evaluated by Pearson's correlation coefficient. The relative risks for first cardiovascular event between individuals above and below the TG/HDL-C sex-specific cut points, and in the top quartile of visceral adiposity index versus the remaining 3 quartiles, were estimated using Cox proportional hazard models.

RESULTS:

TG/HDL-C concentration and visceral adiposity index were highly correlated (r = 0.99) in both men and women. Although more men (133 vs121) and women (73 vs 59) were identified as being at "high risk" by an elevated TG/HDL-C ratio, the individual cardiometabolic risk factors were essentially identical with either index used. However, the hazard ratio of developing cardiovascular disease was significantly increased in individuals with an elevated TG/HDL-C, whereas it was not the case when the visceral adiposity index was used to define "high risk."

CONCLUSION:

The visceral adiposity index does not identify individuals with an adverse cardiometabolic profile any better than the TG/HDL-C.

KEYWORDS:

Cardiovascular outcome; TG/HDL-C ratio; Visceral adiposity index

PMID:
24462013
DOI:
10.1016/j.amjmed.2013.10.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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