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Dialogues Clin Neurosci. 2013 Dec;15(4):419-29.

A neurobiological approach to the cognitive deficits of psychiatric disorders.

Author information

1
Departments of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA.
2
Departments of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA, Sierra-Pacific Mental Illness Research, Education, and Clinical Center (MIRECC), Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California, USA.

Abstract

in English, French, Spanish

Deficits in brain networks that support cognitive regulatory functions are prevalent in many psychiatric disorders. Findings across neuropsychology and neuroimaging point to broad-based impairments that cross traditional diagnostic boundaries. These dysfunctions are largely separate from the classical symptoms of the disorders, and manifest in regulatory problems in both traditional cognitive and emotional domains. As such, they relate to the capacity of patients to engage effectively in their daily lives and activity, often persist even in the face of symptomatically effective treatment, and are poorly targeted by current treatments. Advances in cognitive neuroscience now allow us to ground an understanding of these cognitive regulatory deficits in the function and interaction of key brain networks. This emerging neurobiological understanding furthermore points to several promising routes for novel neuroscience-informed treatments targeted more specifically at improving cognitive function in a range of psychiatric disorders.

KEYWORDS:

amygdala; anxiety; bipolar; cingulate; default mode; depression; emotion regulation; executive function; prefrontal; schizophrenia

PMID:
24459409
PMCID:
PMC3898680
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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