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Mar Pollut Bull. 2014 Feb 15;79(1-2):39-46. doi: 10.1016/j.marpolbul.2014.01.008. Epub 2014 Jan 20.

The larvae of congeneric gastropods showed differential responses to the combined effects of ocean acidification, temperature and salinity.

Author information

1
Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.
2
Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China; State Key Laboratory in Marine Pollution, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.
3
Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China; State Key Laboratory in Marine Pollution, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. Electronic address: bhpshin@cityu.edu.hk.

Abstract

The tolerance and physiological responses of the larvae of two congeneric gastropods, the intertidal Nassarius festivus and subtidal Nassarius conoidalis, to the combined effects of ocean acidification (pCO2 at 380, 950, 1250 ppm), temperature (15, 30°C) and salinity (10, 30 psu) were compared. Results of three-way ANOVA on cumulative mortality after 72-h exposure showed significant interactive effects in which mortality increased with pCO2 and temperature, but reduced at higher salinity for both species, with higher mortality being obtained for N. conoidalis. Similarly, respiration rate of the larvae increased with temperature and pCO2 level for both species, with a larger percentage increase for N. conoidalis. Larval swimming speed increased with temperature and salinity for both species whereas higher pCO2 reduced swimming speed in N. conoidalis but not N. festivus. The present findings indicated that subtidal congeneric species are more sensitive than their intertidal counterparts to the combined effects of these stressors.

KEYWORDS:

Larvae; Mortality; Nassarius; Ocean acidification; Respiration; Swimming behavior

PMID:
24456853
DOI:
10.1016/j.marpolbul.2014.01.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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