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Oxid Med Cell Longev. 2013;2013:598493. doi: 10.1155/2013/598493. Epub 2013 Dec 17.

Modulation of antioxidant enzymatic activities by certain antiepileptic drugs (valproic acid, oxcarbazepine, and topiramate): evidence in humans and experimental models.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Neurochemistry, National Institute of Pediatrics, 04530 DF, Mexico.
2
Laboratory of Pharmacology, National Institute of Pediatrics, 04530 DF, Mexico.
3
Laboratory of Molecular Biology and Genomics, Faculty of Sciences, University City, UNAM, 04150 DF, Mexico.
4
Laboratory of Experimental Nutrition, National Institute of Pediatrics, 04530 DF, Mexico.
5
Service of Endocrinology, National Institute of Pediatrics, 04530 DF, Mexico.
6
Section of Research and Graduate Studies, IPN, 11430 DF, Mexico.

Abstract

It is estimated that at least 100 million people worldwide will suffer from epilepsy at some point in their lives. This neurological disorder induces brain death due to the excessive liberation of glutamate, which activates the postsynaptic N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors, which in turn cause the reuptake of intracellular calcium (excitotoxicity). This excitotoxicity elicits a series of events leading to nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activation and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Several studies in experimental models and in humans have demonstrated that certain antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) exhibit antioxidant effects by modulating the activity of various enzymes associated with this type of stress. Considering the above-mentioned data, we aimed to compile evidence elucidating how AEDs such as valproic acid (VPA), oxcarbazepine (OXC), and topiramate (TPM) modulate oxidative stress.

PMID:
24454986
PMCID:
PMC3877618
DOI:
10.1155/2013/598493
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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