Format

Send to

Choose Destination
PM R. 2014 Aug;6(8):690-7. doi: 10.1016/j.pmrj.2014.01.010. Epub 2014 Jan 18.

Pain location and functioning in persons with spinal cord injury.

Author information

1
Unit for the Study and Treatment of Pain - ALGOS, Centre de Recerca en Avaluació i Mesura del Comportament, Institut d'Investigació Sanitària Pere Virgili, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Carretera de Valls, Tarragona, Catalonia, Spain(∗).
2
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA(†).
3
St. Luke's Rehabilitation Institute, 711 S Cowley St, Spokane, WA 99202-1330(‡). Electronic address: gtcarter@uw.edu.
4
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA(§).

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The influence of pain location and extent on functioning in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) and chronic pain is not well understood.

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the correlations between pain location and extent to determine which pain domains may be important to assess and potentially target in treating chronic pain in SCI populations.

DESIGN:

Prospective, observational study.

SETTING:

University medical center.

PARTICIPANTS:

A total of 259 persons with an SCI and chronic pain.

METHODS:

Postal mail survey questionnaire.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS:

Pain sites, pain extent (number of sites), pain intensity in specific body locations, pain interference, and physical and psychological functioning.

RESULTS:

A positive association between pain extent and intensity with pain interference (r = 0.33, P < .01) and a negative association with psychological functioning were noted in the study sample (r = -0.21, P < .01). Pain intensity in the lower back and legs (r = 0.55, P < .01) and a number of other sites showed strong associations with patient functioning. Correlation with psychological functioning was significant but weaker (r = -0.22, P < .01 for the lower back and legs). Ambulatory status had only a small moderating effect on the associations between pain intensity in specific sites and pain interference and no effect on psychological functioning.

CONCLUSIONS:

The findings support the importance of assessing pain intensity at specific locations as a part of a thorough evaluation of chronic pain, as well as the importance of addressing pain at multiple sites, when managing pain in persons with an SCI.

PMID:
24448429
PMCID:
PMC4467570
DOI:
10.1016/j.pmrj.2014.01.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center