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Br J Cancer. 2014 Mar 4;110(5):1118-24. doi: 10.1038/bjc.2014.3. Epub 2014 Jan 21.

Thrombosis in ovarian cancer: a case control study.

Author information

1
Department of Medical Oncology, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Wilmslow Road, Manchester M20 4BX, UK.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Thrombotic events are common in cancer patients and have been associated with an adverse prognosis in large registry-based studies.

METHODS:

A retrospective cohort of 417 patients with ovarian cancer treated at a tertiary cancer centre between 2006 and 2009 was studied to identify the incidence and risk factors for thrombotic events and the prognostic impact of thrombosis. Patient outcomes were evaluated against a matched control group without thrombosis.

RESULTS:

Ninety-nine thrombotic events occurred in 90 patients (21.6%) from 8 months before diagnosis to 56 months following diagnosis, peaking in the 4 months following diagnosis. Patients with thrombosis were older (mean 65 vs 61 years, P=0.007), had a worse performance status (PS ≥2: 29.9% vs 9.5%, P<0.0001) and had a more advanced FIGO stage (FIGO III/IV 75.6% vs 56.9%, P<0.0001) than patients without thrombosis. Shorter overall survival was seen in patients with pulmonary embolism and pelvic/lower limb deep vein thrombosis than without thrombosis (P=0.001). When the control group was matched for stage and PS, no survival difference was seen (P=0.91).

CONCLUSION:

Ovarian cancer patients with thrombotic events had a shorter survival. However, when matched for prognostic factors (PS and FIGO stage), thrombosis did not impact upon prognosis.

PMID:
24448364
PMCID:
PMC3950877
DOI:
10.1038/bjc.2014.3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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