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Nat Commun. 2014;5:3043. doi: 10.1038/ncomms4043.

Biomimetic virus-based colourimetric sensors.

Author information

1
1] Department of Bioengineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA [2] Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720, USA [3] Department of Nano Fusion Technology, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735, Korea [4] Department of Nanomaterials Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735, Korea.
2
1] Department of Bioengineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA [2] Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720, USA [3] College of Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746, Korea.
3
1] Department of Bioengineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA [2] Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720, USA.
4
1] Department of Bioengineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA [2] Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720, USA [3] Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-701, Korea.
5
Department of Nano Fusion Technology, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735, Korea.
6
Department of Nanomaterials Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735, Korea.
7
Life Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720, USA.
8
Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720, USA.

Abstract

Many materials in nature change colours in response to stimuli, making them attractive for use as sensor platform. However, both natural materials and their synthetic analogues lack selectivity towards specific chemicals, and introducing such selectivity remains a challenge. Here we report the self-assembly of genetically engineered viruses (M13 phage) into target-specific, colourimetric biosensors. The sensors are composed of phage-bundle nanostructures and exhibit viewing-angle independent colour, similar to collagen structures in turkey skin. On exposure to various volatile organic chemicals, the structures rapidly swell and undergo distinct colour changes. Furthermore, sensors composed of phage displaying trinitrotoluene (TNT)-binding peptide motifs identified from a phage display selectively distinguish TNT down to 300 p.p.b. over similarly structured chemicals. Our tunable, colourimetric sensors can be useful for the detection of a variety of harmful toxicants and pathogens to protect human health and national security.

PMID:
24448217
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms4043
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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