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Res Dev Disabil. 2014 Mar;35(3):639-45. doi: 10.1016/j.ridd.2013.12.012. Epub 2014 Jan 18.

An investigation of the factors affecting flatfoot in children with delayed motor development.

Author information

1
School of Physical Therapy, Chung Shan Medical University, 110, Sec. 1, Jianguo N. Rd., Taichung 402, Taiwan; Physical Therapy Room, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, 110, Sec. 1, Jianguo N. Rd., Taichung 402, Taiwan.
2
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Chi Mei Medical Center, 901, Zhonghua Rd., Yongkang Dist., Tainan 710, Taiwan.
3
Program of Landscape and Recreation, National Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuo, Kuang Rd., Taichung 402, Taiwan.
4
School of Public Health, Chung Shan Medical University, 110, Sec. 1, Jianguo N. Rd., Taichung 402, Taiwan.
5
Department of Physical Therapy, National Cheng Kung University, 1, Ta-Hsueh Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan.
6
School of Physical Therapy, Chung Shan Medical University, 110, Sec. 1, Jianguo N. Rd., Taichung 402, Taiwan; Physical Therapy Room, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, 110, Sec. 1, Jianguo N. Rd., Taichung 402, Taiwan. Electronic address: chwang@csmu.edu.tw.

Abstract

This study investigated the prevalence of flatfoot in children with delayed motor development and the relevant factors affecting it. In total, 121 preschool-aged children aged 3-6 with delayed motor development (male: 81; female: 40) were enrolled in the motor-developmentally delayed children group, and 4 times that number, a total of 484 children (male: 324; female: 160), of gender- and age-matched normal developmental children were used as a control group for further analyses. The age was from 3.0 to 6.9 years old for the participants. The judgment criterion of flatfoot was the Chippaux-Smirak index >62.70%, in footprint measurement. The results showed that the prevalence of flatfoot in children with motor developmental delay was higher than that in normal developmental children, approximately 58.7%, and that it decreased with age from 62.8% of 3-year-olds to 50.0% of 6-year-olds. The results also showed that motor-developmentally delayed children with flatfoot are at about 1.5 times the risk of normal developmental children (odds ratio=1.511, p=0.005). In addition, the prevalence of flatfoot is relatively higher in overweight children with delayed motor development, and that in obese children is even as high as 95.8% (23/24). Children with both excessive joint laxity and delayed development are more likely to suffer from flatfoot. The findings of this study can serve as a reference for clinical workers to deal with foot issues in children with delayed motor development.

KEYWORDS:

Developmental delay; Flatfoot; Preschool-aged children

PMID:
24444612
DOI:
10.1016/j.ridd.2013.12.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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