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Gene. 2014 Mar 15;538(1):12-22. doi: 10.1016/j.gene.2014.01.029. Epub 2014 Jan 17.

Characterization of three Arabidopsis thaliana immunophilin genes involved in the plant defense response against Pseudomonas syringae.

Author information

1
219 Bessey Hall, Department of Plant Pathology and Microbiology, Iowa State University, Ames 50014, IA, USA; NI Vavilov Institute of General Genetics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119991, Russia. Electronic address: gennady@iastate.edu.
2
NI Vavilov Institute of General Genetics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119991, Russia. Electronic address: marja-2007@yandex.ru.
3
Geocryology Department, Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory 1, Moscow 119992, Russia. Electronic address: oksfursova@yandex.ru.
4
NI Vavilov Institute of General Genetics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119991, Russia. Electronic address: insaz@yandex.ru.
5
NI Vavilov Institute of General Genetics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119991, Russia. Electronic address: eleopiru@vigg.ru.
6
NI Vavilov Institute of General Genetics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119991, Russia. Electronic address: sergey.bruskin@gmail.com.

Erratum in

  • Gene. 2014 Apr 15;539(2):283.

Abstract

Plant immunophilins are a broadly conserved family of proteins, which carry out a variety of cellular functions. In this study, we investigated three immunophilin genes involved in the Arabidopsis thaliana response to Pseudomonas syringae infection: a cytoplasmic localized AtCYP19, a cytoplasmic and nuclear localized AtCYP57, and one nucleus directed FKBP known as AtFKBP65. Arabidopsis knock-out mutations in these immunophilins result in an increased susceptibility to P. syringae, whereas overexpression of these genes alters the transcription profile of pathogen-related defense genes and led to enhanced resistance. Histochemical analysis revealed local gene expression of AtCYP19, AtCYP57, and AtFKBP65 in response to pathogen infection. AtCYP19 was shown to be involved in reactive oxygen species production, and both AtCYP57 and AtFKBP65 provided callose accumulation in plant cell wall. Identification of the involvement of these genes in biotic stress response brings a new set of data that will advance plant immune system research and can be widely used for further investigation in this area.

KEYWORDS:

Immunophilin family; Plant immune system; Plant–pathogen interaction

PMID:
24440291
DOI:
10.1016/j.gene.2014.01.029
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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