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Cell. 2014 Jan 16;156(1-2):20-44. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2013.12.012.

What we talk about when we talk about fat.

Author information

1
Division of Endocrinology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA 02215, USA; Departments of Genetics and Cell Biology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215, USA; Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA. Electronic address: erosen@bidmc.harvard.edu.
2
Departments of Genetics and Cell Biology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215, USA; Department of Cancer Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Electronic address: bruce_spiegelman@dfci.harvard.edu.

Abstract

There has been an upsurge of interest in the adipocyte coincident with the onset of the obesity epidemic and the realization that adipose tissue plays a major role in the regulation of metabolic function. The past few years, in particular, have seen significant changes in the way that we classify adipocytes and how we view adipose development and differentiation. We have new perspective on the roles played by adipocytes in a variety of homeostatic processes and on the mechanisms used by adipocytes to communicate with other tissues. Finally, there has been significant progress in understanding how these relationships are altered during metabolic disease and how they might be manipulated to restore metabolic health.

PMID:
24439368
PMCID:
PMC3934003
DOI:
10.1016/j.cell.2013.12.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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