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Comput Med Imaging Graph. 2014 Apr;38(3):163-70. doi: 10.1016/j.compmedimag.2013.12.010. Epub 2013 Dec 31.

Primary ciliary dyskinesia assessment by means of optical flow analysis of phase-contrast microscopy images.

Author information

1
Biomechanics Institute of Valencia (IBV), Spain.
2
Otorrinolaringology Service and Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia Unit of the Hospital General Universitario and with the Facultat de Medicina, Universitat de València, Valencia, Spain.
3
Fundación para la Investigación and Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia Unit of the Hospital General Universitario, Valencia, Spain.
4
Center for Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering, Universitat Politècnica de València, Valencia, Spain.
5
Institute of Multidisciplinary Mathematics, Universitat Politècnica de València, Valencia, Spain.
6
Center for Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering, Universitat Politècnica de València, Valencia, Spain. Electronic address: dmoratal@eln.upv.es.

Abstract

Primary ciliary dyskinesia implies cilia with defective or total absence of motility, which may result in sinusitis, chronic bronchitis, bronchiectasis and male infertility. Diagnosis can be difficult and is based on an abnormal ciliary beat frequency (CBF) and beat pattern. In this paper, we present a method to determine CBF of isolated cells through the analysis of phase-contrast microscopy images, estimating cilia motion by means of an optical flow algorithm. After having analyzed 28 image sequences (14 with a normal beat pattern and 14 with a dyskinetic pattern), the normal group presented a CBF of 5.2 ± 1.6 Hz, while the dyskinetic patients presented a 1.9 ± 0.9 Hz CBF. The cutoff value to classify a dyskinetic specimen was set to 3.45 Hz (sensitivity 0.86, specificity 0.93). The presented methodology has provided excellent results to objectively diagnose PCD.

KEYWORDS:

Active contours; Beat frequency; Fourier-Mellin transform; Optical flow; Primary ciliary dyskinesia

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