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Acta Biochim Pol. 2013;60(4):719-24.

Antibiotics sensitivity of Candida clinical and food-borne isolates.

Author information

1
Department of Biotechnology and Food Science, Institute of Fermentation Technology and Microbiology, Lodz University of Technology, Łódź, Poland; Biotechnology Laboratory, Regional Park of Science and Technology Ltd., Łódź, Poland.
2
Department of Biotechnology and Food Science, Institute of Fermentation Technology and Microbiology, Lodz University of Technology, Łódź, Poland.
3
Department of Intensive Care and Congenital Newborn and Infants, Polish Mother's Memorial Hospital Research Institute, Łódź, Poland.

Abstract

Candida is a yeast species recognized as the most frequent etiological agent of systemic and invasive thrush in humans. Invasions can affect all tissues, organs and systems of human in various stages of development. In the last 10 years Candida infections have increased 15 times. The purpose of our study was to determine the sensitivity of four antibiotics belonging to three different groups of antifungal agents against clinical and food-borne Candida strains. Our studies showed that of all tested strains, 7% was resistant to nystatin, 32% to fluconazole, 23% to voriconazole, and no strains grew in the presence of caspofungin. Despite the differences in biochemical profiles of clinical and food-borne isolates of Candida, a group of strains showing resistance to antibiotics include both types of isolates. At the same time circulating of antibiotic-resistant strains outside the hospital environment and the yeast infection via food is possible.

PMID:
24432323
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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