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J Sports Sci Med. 2005 Jun 1;4(2):195-200. eCollection 2005 Jun 1.

Preferred modality influences on exercise-induced mood changes.

Author information

1
University of Wolverhampton , UK.
2
Brunel University , UK.
3
University of Southern Queensland , Australia.

Abstract

The present study tested, both retrospectively and prospectively, exercise-induced mood changes among regular exercisers. Specifically, it examined the extent to which preferred exercise modality promoted greater mood benefits. A group of 25 exercise participants (M = 35.5 yr., SD = 10.5 yr.) took part in the study. All participants had exercised at least three times a week (M = 3.5, SD = 2.3) during the previous year. Participants completed a 14-item Exercise Preference Questionnaire to provide retrospective evaluations of their most- and least-preferred type of exercise. For the prospective investigation, participants completed the Brunel Mood Scale (BRUMS) 15 minutes before and immediately after their most- and least-preferred exercise sessions. One week separated completion of each exercise session. Retrospective assessment of exercise-induced mood changes showed strong support for enhanced mood following the preferred mode of exercise. Also, as hypothesized, prospective results showed that mood enhancement was greater following the preferred exercise modality, but significant mood enhancement also occurred following the least-preferred modality among experienced exercisers. In conclusions, findings support the principle that exercise can provide psychological benefits to its participants, in the form of positive affective outcomes, something that appears to be enhanced by preferred exercise modality. Given the important public health implications of exercise adherence, future research should seek to further investigate the mechanisms of exercise-induced mood enhancement. Key PointsA great deal of exercise shows that exercise is associated with positive mood following exercise. Previous research has sought to determine whether one form of exercise improved mood states more than others.The present study investigated the extent to which personal preference of exercise modality influenced mood changes following exercise.Participants completed mood state scales before and after exercise.Results support the notion that exercise can provide psychological benefits to its participants, in the form of positive affective outcomes, something that appears to be enhanced by preferred exercise modality.

KEYWORDS:

BRUMS; Mood; POMS; affect; emotion; exercise; preferred modality

PMID:
24431976
PMCID:
PMC3880887

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