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J Neurosci. 2014 Jan 15;34(3):992-1006. doi: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3437-13.2014.

An unconventional secretory pathway mediates the cilia targeting of peripherin/rds.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106-4965.

Abstract

It is unclear how unconventional secretion interplays with conventional secretion for the normal maintenance and renewal of membrane structures. The photoreceptor sensory cilium is recognized for fast membrane renewal, for which rhodopsin and peripherin/rds (P/rds) play critical roles. Here, we provide evidence that P/rds is targeted to the cilia by an unconventional secretion pathway. When expressed in ciliated hTERT-RPE1 human cell line, P/rd is localized to cilia. Cilium trafficking of P/rds was sustained even when the Golgi functions, including trans-Golgi-mediated conventional secretion, were inhibited by the small molecules brefeldin A, 30N12, and monensin. The unconventional cilia targeting of P/rds is dependent on COPII-mediated exit from the ER, but appears to be independent of GRASP55-mediated secretion. The regions in the C-terminal tail of P/rds are essential for this unconventional trafficking. In the absence of the region required for cilia targeting, P/rds was prohibited from entering the secretory pathways and was retained in the Golgi apparatus. A region essential for this Golgi retention was also found in the C-terminal tail of P/rds and supported the cilia targeting of P/rds mediated by unconventional secretion. In ciliated cells, including bovine and Xenopus laevis rod photoreceptors, P/rds was robustly sensitive to endoglycosidase H, which is consistent with its bypassing the medial Golgi and traversing the unconventional secretory pathway. Because rhodopsin is known to traffic through conventional secretion, this study of P/rds suggests that both conventional secretion and unconventional secretion need to cooperate for the renewal of the photoreceptor sensory cilium.

KEYWORDS:

cilia; peripherin/rds; photoreceptor; retina; trafficking; unconventional secretion

PMID:
24431457
PMCID:
PMC3891973
DOI:
10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3437-13.2014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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