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J Hum Hypertens. 2014 Nov;28(11):689-93. doi: 10.1038/jhh.2013.152. Epub 2014 Jan 16.

Impact of metabolic syndrome components on incident stroke subtypes: a Chinese cohort study.

Author information

1
Graduate Institute of Life Sciences, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei City, Taiwan, Republic of China.
2
Department of Public Health, College of Medicine, Fu-Jen Catholic University, New Taipei City, Taiwan, Republic of China.
3
Department of Health Business Administration, Meiho University, Pingtung, Taiwan, Republic of China.
4
Department of Surgery, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei City, Taiwan, Republic of China.
5
School of Public Health, College of Public Health and Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, Taipei City, Taiwan, Republic of China.
6
1] Genomics Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei City, Taiwan, Republic of China [2] School of Public Health, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei City, Taiwan, Republic of China.
7
Department of Medicine, Mackay Medical College, New Taipei City, Taiwan, Republic of China.
8
Digestive Disease Center, Changhua Show-Chwan Memorial Hospital, Changhua County, Taiwan, Republic of China.
9
Department of Neurology, Chang Bing Show-Chwan Memorial Hospital, Changhua County, Taiwan, Republic of China.
10
1] Graduate Institute of Life Sciences, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei City, Taiwan, Republic of China [2] School of Public Health, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei City, Taiwan, Republic of China.

Abstract

Limited evidence is available on the risk differences in the development of stroke subtypes in relation to particular clustering patterns of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) components. A follow-up study of a Chinese cohort involving 10,292 individuals was performed to assess the roles of cluster patterns of the MetS components in the prediction of incident stroke subtypes. During follow-up, there were 161 incident cases of ischemic strokes and 41 incident cases of hemorrhagic strokes. Among MetS components, only the hypertensive trait was associated with significantly elevated risks of both ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes. Furthermore, MetS with hypertension as components was associated with increased risk of ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes (adjusted hazards ratio (95% confidence interval) was 2.96 (1.94-4.50) and 2.93 (1.25-6.90), respectively) as compared with those who had neither hypertension nor MetS. Notably, as the number of the MetS components increased, the risk of ischemic stroke significantly and dose-dependently increased. This implies a cumulative effect of MetS components in elevating the risk of ischemic stroke. These findings suggest that MetS comprises heterogenous clusters with respect to the risk of developing the subtype of stroke.

PMID:
24430706
DOI:
10.1038/jhh.2013.152
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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