Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Sci Rep. 2014 Jan 16;4:3733. doi: 10.1038/srep03733.

Engineering the heart: evaluation of conductive nanomaterials for improving implant integration and cardiac function.

Author information

1
1] Department of Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences and Tissue Engineering Research Center, 27 Taiping Rd, Academy of Military Medical Sciences, Beijing, China [2].
2
1] Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Biochemistry and Medical Genetics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba and Manitoba Institute of Child Health, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada [2].
3
1] Department of Anatomy, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou Guangdong, China [2].
4
Department of Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences and Tissue Engineering Research Center, 27 Taiping Rd, Academy of Military Medical Sciences, Beijing, China.
5
Department of Textile Sciences, Faculty of Human Ecology, Department of Medical Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Canada.
6
Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Engineering, 5 Yiheyuan Rd, Peking University, HaidianDist, Beijing, China.
7
Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Biochemistry and Medical Genetics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba and Manitoba Institute of Child Health, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.

Abstract

Recently, carbon nanotubes together with other types of conductive materials have been used to enhance the viability and function of cardiomyocytes in vitro. Here we demonstrated a paradigm to construct ECTs for cardiac repair using conductive nanomaterials. Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were incorporated into gelatin hydrogel scaffolds to construct three-dimensional ECTs. We found that SWNTs could provide cellular microenvironment in vitro favorable for cardiac contraction and the expression of electrochemical associated proteins. Upon implantation into the infarct hearts in rats, ECTs structurally integrated with the host myocardium, with different types of cells observed to mutually invade into implants and host tissues. The functional measurements showed that SWNTs were essential to improve the performance of ECTs in inhibiting pathological deterioration of myocardium. This work suggested that conductive nanomaterials hold therapeutic potential in engineering cardiac tissues to repair myocardial infarction.

PMID:
24429673
PMCID:
PMC3893643
DOI:
10.1038/srep03733
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center