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Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2014 Mar;39(5):488-95. doi: 10.1111/apt.12621. Epub 2014 Jan 16.

Predictors of persistent villous atrophy in coeliac disease: a population-based study.

Author information

1
Celiac Disease Center, Department of Medicine, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY, USA; Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Villous atrophy (VA) with intraepithelial lymphocytosis is the histological hallmark of coeliac disease (CD), but reported rates of mucosal recovery are variable.

AIM:

To determine the impact of age and other demographic variables on the probability of persistent VA on follow-up biopsy.

METHODS:

We identified patients with VA on duodenal histology at all 28 Swedish pathology departments during the years spanning 1969-2008. We examined age, gender, calendar period, duration of disease and educational attainment to determine predictors of persistent VA.

RESULTS:

Of 7648 patients with CD who underwent follow-up biopsy, persistent VA was present in 3317 (43%; 95% CI 42-44%). The effect of age on persistent VA varied according to time period; among those biopsied in the years spanning 2000-2008, the prevalence of persistent VA was 31%, and increasing age was associated with increasing rates of persistent VA (17% among those younger than 2 years compared to 56% among those ≥70 years). In contrast, persistent VA did not vary widely by age in earlier years. On multivariate analysis (restricted to the calendar period 2000-2008, 2-5 years after CD diagnosis), persistent VA was more common among males (OR 1.43; 95% CI 1.07-1.90) and less common among patients with higher educational attainment (OR for college degree vs. <2 years of high school 0.52, 95% CI 0.35-0.78).

CONCLUSIONS:

The prevalence of persistent villous atrophy has changed over time, with greater rates of healing in recent years. Social differences in persistent villous atrophy suggest that access and/or education regarding the gluten-free diet impact mucosal healing.

PMID:
24428688
PMCID:
PMC4012428
DOI:
10.1111/apt.12621
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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