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J Urol. 2014 Jun;191(6):1665-70. doi: 10.1016/j.juro.2013.12.046. Epub 2014 Jan 11.

Continued increase in incidence of renal cell carcinoma, especially in young patients and high grade disease: United States 2001 to 2010.

Author information

1
Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Department of Urology and Winship Cancer Institute, School of Medicine, Emory University (VAM), Atlanta, Georgia. Electronic address: fjq9@cdc.gov.
2
Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Department of Urology and Winship Cancer Institute, School of Medicine, Emory University (VAM), Atlanta, Georgia.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

More than 50,000 Americans were diagnosed with kidney and renal pelvis cancer in 2010. The National Program of Cancer Registries and SEER (Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results) combined data include cancer incidences from the entire United States. Our study presents updated incidence data, evaluates trends and adds geographic distribution to the literature.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

We examined invasive, microscopically confirmed kidney and renal pelvis cancers diagnosed from 2001 to 2010 that met United States Cancer Statistics reporting criteria for each year, excluding cases diagnosed by autopsy or death certificate. Histology codes classified cases as renal cell carcinoma. Rates and trends were estimated using SEER∗Stat.

RESULTS:

A total of 342,501 renal cell carcinoma cases were diagnosed. The renal cell carcinoma incidence rate increased from 10.6/100,000 individuals in 2001 to 12.4/100,000 in 2010 and increased with age until ages 70 to 74 years. The incidence rate in men was almost double that in women. The annual percent change was higher in women than in men, in those 20 to 24 years old and in grade III tumors.

CONCLUSIONS:

The annual percent change incidence increased from 2001 to 2010. Asian/Pacific Islanders and 20 to 24-year-old individuals had the highest annual percent change. While some increase resulted from localized disease, the highest annual percent change was in grade III tumors, indicating more aggressive disease. Continued monitoring of trends and epidemiological study are warranted to determine risk factors.

KEYWORDS:

SEER program; carcinoma; epidemiology; kidney; renal cell; young adult

PMID:
24423441
PMCID:
PMC4479175
DOI:
10.1016/j.juro.2013.12.046
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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