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Med Sci Monit. 2014 Jan 14;20:47-53. doi: 10.12659/MSM.889333.

Multivitamin mineral supplementation in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome.

Author information

1
Clinic for Infectious Diseases, Clinical Center Vojvodina, Faculty of Medicine, University of Novi Sad, Novi Sad, Serbia.
2
Faculty of Medicine, University of Novi Sad, Novi Sad, Serbia.
3
Biochemistry Department, Clinical Center Vojvodina, Faculty of Medicine, University of Novi Sad, Novi Sad, Serbia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is characterized by medically unexplained persistent or reoccurring fatigue lasting at least 6 months. CFS has a multifactorial pathogenesis in which oxidative stress (OS) plays a prominent role. Treatment is with a vitamin and mineral supplement, but this therapeutic option so far has not been properly researched.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

This prospective study included 38 women of reproductive age consecutively diagnosed by CDC definition of CFS and treated with a multivitamin mineral supplement. Before and after the 2-month supplementation, SOD activity was determined and patients self-assessed their improvement in 2 questionnaires: the Fibro Fatigue Scale (FFS) and the Quality of Life Scale (SF36). Results There was a significant improvement in SOD activity levels; and significant decreases in fatigue (p=0.0009), sleep disorders (p=0.008), autonomic nervous system symptoms (p=0.018), frequency and intensity of headaches (p=0.0001), and subjective feeling of infection (p=0.0002). No positive effect on quality of life was found.

CONCLUSIONS:

Treatment with a vitamin and mineral supplement could be a safe and easy way to improve symptoms and quality of life in patients with CFS.

PMID:
24419360
PMCID:
PMC3907507
DOI:
10.12659/MSM.889333
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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