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Biotechnol Adv. 2014 Mar-Apr;32(2):462-84. doi: 10.1016/j.biotechadv.2013.12.012. Epub 2014 Jan 10.

Decellularized tissue and cell-derived extracellular matrices as scaffolds for orthopaedic tissue engineering.

Author information

1
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Wickenden Building, Rm 218, Cleveland, OH, USA; Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Case Western Reserve University, 11100 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, USA. Electronic address: chengcw@gmail.com.
2
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Wickenden Building, Rm 218, Cleveland, OH, USA. Electronic address: loran.solorio@gmail.com.
3
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Wickenden Building, Rm 218, Cleveland, OH, USA; Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Case Western Reserve University, 11100 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, USA; National Center for Regenerative Medicine, Division of General Medical Sciences, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA. Electronic address: eben.alsberg@case.edu.

Abstract

The reconstruction of musculoskeletal defects is a constant challenge for orthopaedic surgeons. Musculoskeletal injuries such as fractures, chondral lesions, infections and tumor debulking can often lead to large tissue voids requiring reconstruction with tissue grafts. Autografts are currently the gold standard in orthopaedic tissue reconstruction; however, there is a limit to the amount of tissue that can be harvested before compromising the donor site. Tissue engineering strategies using allogeneic or xenogeneic decellularized bone, cartilage, skeletal muscle, tendon and ligament have emerged as promising potential alternative treatment. The extracellular matrix provides a natural scaffold for cell attachment, proliferation and differentiation. Decellularization of in vitro cell-derived matrices can also enable the generation of autologous constructs from tissue specific cells or progenitor cells. Although decellularized bone tissue is widely used clinically in orthopaedic applications, the exciting potential of decellularized cartilage, skeletal muscle, tendon and ligament cell-derived matrices has only recently begun to be explored for ultimate translation to the orthopaedic clinic.

KEYWORDS:

Articular cartilage; Bone; Decellularized matrix; Extracellular matrix; Ligaments; Skeletal muscle; Tendons; Tissue engineering; Tissue scaffolds

PMID:
24417915
PMCID:
PMC3959761
DOI:
10.1016/j.biotechadv.2013.12.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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