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Arch Womens Ment Health. 2014 Oct;17(5):359-66. doi: 10.1007/s00737-013-0401-8. Epub 2014 Jan 12.

Perceived discrimination, family functioning, and depressive symptoms among immigrant women in Taiwan.

Author information

1
Department of Public Health, Chung Shan Medical University, No.110, Sec.1, Jianguo N. Rd., Taichung, 40201, Taiwan, hjyang@csmu.edu.tw.

Abstract

This study examined the moderating effect of family functioning on the relationship between perceived discrimination and depressive symptoms in immigrant women. A total of 239 immigrant women were selected from four administrative regions in Central Taiwan. Questionnaires concerning perceived discrimination, family functioning (including family cohesion and family adaptability), depressive symptoms, and demographic characteristics were completed by either women themselves (N = 120) or their husbands (N = 119). The moderating effect of family functioning on the relationship between perceived discrimination and depression symptoms was analyzed using multiple regression analysis. Findings showed that a higher level of perceived discrimination among immigrant women is associated with more severe depressive symptoms. Family functioning serves as a moderator between the relationship of perceived discrimination and depressive symptoms, but the moderating effect of family adaptability was evident only in data reported by immigrant women. The results indicate that perceived discrimination has negative mental health implications, and also point to the importance of family functioning for depression. Findings suggest that providers should consider addressing immigrant women's mental health needs through declining their psychosocial distress at multiple ecological levels.

PMID:
24414300
DOI:
10.1007/s00737-013-0401-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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