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J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2014 May 1;66 Suppl 1:S57-65. doi: 10.1097/QAI.0000000000000106.

Medical injection use among adults and adolescents aged 15 to 64 years in Kenya: results from a national survey.

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1
*Center for Global Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Nairobi, Kenya; †National AIDS and Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI) Programme, Ministry of Health, Nairobi, Kenya; and ‡National Public Health Laboratory Services, Ministry of Health, Nairobi, Kenya.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Unsafe medical injections remain a potential route of HIV transmission in Kenya. We used data from a national survey in Kenya to study the magnitude of medical injection use, medication preference, and disposal of medical waste in the community.

METHODS:

The Kenya AIDS Indicator Survey 2012 was a nationally representative population-based survey. Among participants aged 15-64 years, data were collected regarding medical injections received in the year preceding the interview; blood samples were collected from participants for HIV testing.

RESULTS:

Of the 13,673 participants who answered questions on medical injections, 35.9% [95% confidence interval (CI): 34.5 to 37.3] reported receiving ≥1 injection in the past 12 months and 51.2% (95% CI: 49.7 to 52.8) preferred receiving an injection over a pill. Among those who received an injection from a health care provider, 95.9% (95% CI: 95.2 to 96.7) observed him/her open a new injection pack, and 7.4% (95% CI: 6.4 to 8.4) had seen a used syringe or needle near their home or community in the past 12 months. Men who had received ≥1 injection in the past 12 months (adjusted odds ratio, 3.2; 95% CI: 1.2 to 8.9) and women who had received an injection in the past 12 months, not for family planning purposes (adjusted odds ratio, 2.6; 95% CI: 1.2 to 5.5), were significantly more likely to be HIV infected compared with those who had not received medical injection in the past 12 months.

CONCLUSIONS:

Injection preference may contribute to high rates of injections in Kenya. Exposure to unsafe medical waste in the community poses risks for injury and infection. We recommend that community- and facility-based injection safety strategies be integrated in disease prevention programs.

PMID:
24413041
PMCID:
PMC4794988
DOI:
10.1097/QAI.0000000000000106
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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