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Cell Rep. 2014 Jan 30;6(2):325-35. doi: 10.1016/j.celrep.2013.12.021. Epub 2014 Jan 9.

The histone-H3K4-specific demethylase KDM5B binds to its substrate and product through distinct PHD fingers.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmacology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO 80045, USA.
2
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA.
3
Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA.
4
Basic Science Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA 98109, USA.
5
Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics and the Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA.
6
Genes and Development Graduate Program, The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, TX 77030, USA.
7
Molecular Biology Program, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO 80045, USA.
8
Molecular Biology Program, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO 80045, USA; Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO 80045, USA.
9
Basic Science Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA 98109, USA; Department of Radiation Oncology, University Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA 98109, USA.
10
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Genes and Development Graduate Program, The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Center for Cancer Epigenetics and Center for Stem Cell and Developmental Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Electronic address: xbshi@mdanderson.org.
11
Department of Pharmacology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO 80045, USA; Molecular Biology Program, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO 80045, USA. Electronic address: tatiana.kutateladze@ucdenver.edu.

Abstract

The histone lysine demethylase KDM5B regulates gene transcription and cell differentiation and is implicated in carcinogenesis. It contains multiple conserved chromatin-associated domains, including three PHD fingers of unknown function. Here, we show that the first and third, but not the second, PHD fingers of KDM5B possess histone binding activities. The PHD1 finger is highly specific for unmodified histone H3 (H3K4me0), whereas the PHD3 finger shows preference for the trimethylated histone mark H3K4me3. RNA-seq analysis indicates that KDM5B functions as a transcriptional repressor for genes involved in inflammatory responses, cell proliferation, adhesion, and migration. Biochemical analysis reveals that KDM5B associates with components of the nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase (NuRD) complex and may cooperate with the histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) in gene repression. KDM5B is downregulated in triple-negative breast cancer relative to estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer. Overexpression of KDM5B in the MDA-MB 231 breast cancer cells suppresses cell migration and invasion, and the PHD1-H3K4me0 interaction is essential for inhibiting migration. These findings highlight tumor-suppressive functions of KDM5B in triple-negative breast cancer cells and suggest a multivalent mechanism for KDM5B-mediated transcriptional regulation.

PMID:
24412361
PMCID:
PMC3918441
DOI:
10.1016/j.celrep.2013.12.021
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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