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Clin Nutr. 2014 Dec;33(6):1122-6. doi: 10.1016/j.clnu.2013.12.009. Epub 2013 Dec 31.

Dietary thylakoids suppress blood glucose and modulate appetite-regulating hormones in pigs exposed to oral glucose tolerance test.

Author information

1
Department of Experimental Medical Science, Appetite Regulation Unit, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Sölvegatan 19, 221 84 Lund, Sweden. Electronic address: caroline.montelius@med.lu.se.
2
Department of Biology, Lund University, Sölvegatan 35, 223 62 Lund, Sweden.
3
Department of Biology, Lund University, Sölvegatan 35, 223 62 Lund, Sweden; Department of Technology and Food Quality Evaluation, Faculty of Public Health, Medical University in Silesia, Jordana 19, 41-808 Zabrze, Poland.
4
Department of Experimental Medical Science, Appetite Regulation Unit, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Sölvegatan 19, 221 84 Lund, Sweden.
5
Department of Biology, Lund University, Sölvegatan 35, 223 62 Lund, Sweden; Department of Medical Biology, Institute of Rural Medicine, Jaczewskiego 2, 20-950 Lublin, Poland.
6
Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark.

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS:

Dietary chloroplast thylakoids have previously been found to reduce food intake and body weight in animal models, and to change metabolic profiles in humans in mixed-food meal studies. The aim of this study was to investigate the modulatory effects of thylakoids on glucose metabolism and appetite-regulating hormones during an oral glucose tolerance test in pigs fed a high fat diet.

METHODS:

Six pigs were fed a high fat diet (36 energy% fat) for one month before oral glucose tolerance test (1 g/kg d-glucose) was performed. The experiment was designed as a cross-over study, either with or without addition of 0.5 g/kg body weight of thylakoid powder.

RESULTS:

The supplementation of thylakoids to the oral glucose tolerance test resulted in decreased blood glucose concentrations during the first hour, increased plasma cholecystokinin concentrations during the first two hours, and decreased late postprandial secretion of ghrelin.

CONCLUSION:

Dietary thylakoids may be a novel agent in reducing the glycaemic responses to high carbohydrate and high glycaemic index foods. Thylakoids may in the future be promising for treatment and prevention of diabetes, overweight and obesity.

KEYWORDS:

Appetite; Cholecystokinin; Ghrelin; High-fat diet; OGTT; Thylakoids

PMID:
24411616
DOI:
10.1016/j.clnu.2013.12.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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