Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Mater Sci Eng C Mater Biol Appl. 2014 Feb 1;35:335-40. doi: 10.1016/j.msec.2013.11.015. Epub 2013 Nov 20.

In-vitro calcification study of polyurethane heart valves.

Author information

1
Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Northeastern University, 334 Snell Engineering Center, 360 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115-5000, USA.
2
Research and Development, Abiomed Inc., 22 Cherry Hill Drive, Danvers, MA 01923, USA.
3
Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Northeastern University, 334 Snell Engineering Center, 360 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115-5000, USA. Electronic address: hamid@coe.neu.edu.

Abstract

Tri-leaflet polyurethane heart valves have been considered as a potential candidate in heart valve replacement surgeries. In this study, polyurethane (Angioflex(®)) heart valve prostheses were fabricated using a solvent-casting method to evaluate their calcification resistance. These valves were subjected to accelerated life testing (continuous opening and closing of the leaflets) in a synthetic calcification solution. Results showed that Angioflex(®) could be considered as a potential material for fabricating prosthetic heart valves with possibly a higher calcification resistance compared to tissue valves. In addition, calcification resistance of bisphosphonate-modified Angioflex(®) valves was also evaluated. Bisphosphonates are considered to enhance the calcification resistance of polymers once covalently bonded to the bulk of the material. However, our in-vitro results showed that bisphosphonate-modified Angioflex(®) valves did not improve the calcification resistance of Angioflex(®) compared to its untreated counterparts. The results also showed that cyclic loading of the valves' leaflets resulted in formation of numerous cracks on the calcified surface, which were not present when calcification study did not involve mechanical loading. Further study of these cracks did not result in enough evidence to conclude whether these cracks have penetrated to the polymeric surface.

KEYWORDS:

Angioflex; Calcification; Heart valve; Polyurethane

PMID:
24411385
DOI:
10.1016/j.msec.2013.11.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center