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World J Gastroenterol. 2013 Dec 28;19(48):9334-42. doi: 10.3748/wjg.v19.i48.9334.

Inhibitor of differentiation proteins do not influence prognosis of biliary tract cancer.

Author information

1
Jan Harder, Department of Gastroenterology, Hematology and Oncology, Hegau-Bodensee-Hochrhein Kliniken, 78221 Singen, Germany.

Abstract

AIM:

To investigate the expression and clinical relevance of inhibitor of differentiation (ID) proteins in biliary tract cancer.

METHODS:

ID protein expression was analyzed in 129 samples from patients with advanced biliary tract cancer (BTC) (45 extrahepatic, 50 intrahepatic, and 34 gallbladder cancers), compared to normal controls and correlated with clinical an pathological parameters.

RESULTS:

ID1-3 proteins are frequently overexpressed in all BTC subtypes analyzed. No correlation between increased ID protein expression and tumor grading, tumor subtype or treatment response was detected. Survival was influenced primary tumor localization (extrahepatic vs intrahepatic and gall bladder cancer, OS 1.5 years vs 0.9 years vs 0.7 years, P = 0.002), by stage at diagnosis (OS 2.7 years in stage I vs 0.6 years in stage IV, P < 0.001), resection status and response to systemic chemotherapy. In a multivariate model, ID protein expression did not correlate with clinical prognosis. Nevertheless, there was a trend of shorter OS in patients with loss of cytoplasmic ID4 protein expression (P = 0.076).

CONCLUSION:

ID protein expression is frequently deregulated in BTC but does not influence clinical prognosis. Their usefulness as prognostic biomarkers in BTC is very limited.

KEYWORDS:

Biliary tract cancer; Cholangiocarcinoma; Inhibitor of differentiation; Prognostic factors

PMID:
24409060
PMCID:
PMC3882406
DOI:
10.3748/wjg.v19.i48.9334
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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