Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Obes Surg. 2014 Jun;24(6):866-76. doi: 10.1007/s11695-013-1153-2.

Metabolic, behavioral, and reproductive effects of vertical sleeve gastrectomy in an obese rat model of polycystic ovary syndrome.

Author information

1
Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, 45267, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrinopathy affecting women of reproductive age. Its clinical expression is diverse, including metabolic, behavioral, and reproductive effects, with many affected by obesity and decreased quality of life. Women with PCOS who have undergone surgically induced weight loss have reported tremendous benefit, not only with weight loss, but also improvement of hyperandrogenism and menstrual cyclicity.

METHODS:

In a rat model of PCOS achieved via chronic administration of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) exposure, we investigated the ability of bariatric surgery, specifically vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG), to ameliorate the metabolic, behavioral, and reproductive abnormalities invoked by this PCOS model.

RESULTS:

We found that DHT treatment combined with exposure to a high-fat diet resulted in increased body weight and body fat, impaired fasting glucose, hirsutism, anxiety, and irregular cycles. VSG resulted in reduced food intake, body weight, and adiposity with improved fasting glucose and triglycerides. VSG induced lower basal corticosterone levels and attenuated stress responsivity. Once the DHT levels decreased to normal, regular estrous cyclicity was also restored.

CONCLUSIONS:

VSG, therefore, improved PCOS manifestations in a comprehensive manner and may represent a potential therapeutic approach for specific aspects of PCOS.

PMID:
24408363
PMCID:
PMC4024375
DOI:
10.1007/s11695-013-1153-2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Springer Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center