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J Infect. 2014 Mar;68(3):205-15. doi: 10.1016/j.jinf.2013.12.014. Epub 2014 Jan 6.

Emergence in China of human disease due to avian influenza A(H10N8)--cause for concern?

Author information

  • 1State Key Laboratory for Emerging Infectious Diseases, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region; Carol Yu Centre for Infection, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region; Research Centre of Infection and Immunology, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region; Department of Microbiology, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region.
  • 2Department of Microbiology, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region.
  • 3State Key Laboratory for Emerging Infectious Diseases, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region; Carol Yu Centre for Infection, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region; Research Centre of Infection and Immunology, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region; Department of Microbiology, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region. Electronic address: kyyuen@hku.hk.

Abstract

In December 2013, China reported the first human case of avian influenza A(H10N8). A 73-year-old female with chronic diseases who had visited a live poultry market succumbed with community-acquired pneumonia. While human infections with avian influenza viruses are usually associated with subtypes prevalent in poultries, A(H10N8) isolates were mostly found in migratory birds and only recently in poultries. Although not possible to predict whether this single intrusion by A(H10N8) is an accident or the start of another epidemic like the preceding A(H7N9) and A(H5N1), several features suggest that A(H10N8) is a potential threat to humans. Recombinant H10 could attach to human respiratory epithelium, and A(H10N4) virus could cause severe infections in minks and chickens. A(H10N8) viruses contain genetic markers for mammalian adaptation and virulence in the haemagglutinin (A135T, S138A[H3 numbering]), M1(N30D, T215A), NS1(P42S) and PB2(E627K) protein. Studies on this human A(H10N8) isolate will reveal its adaptability to humans. Clinicians should alert the laboratory to test for A(H5,6,7,9,10) viruses in patients with epidemiological exposure in endemic geographical areas especially when human influenza A(H1,3) and B are negative. Vigilant virological and serological surveillance for A(H10N8) in human, poultry and wild bird is important for following the trajectory of this emerging influenza virus.

KEYWORDS:

Avian influenza virus; H10N8; H5N1; H7N9

PMID:
24406432
DOI:
10.1016/j.jinf.2013.12.014
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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