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Physiother Can. 2013 Spring;65(2):116-24. doi: 10.3138/ptc.2011-60.

Prehabilitation improves physical function of individuals with severe disability from hip or knee osteoarthritis.

Author information

1
School of Rehabilitation, Faculty of Medicine ; University of Montreal Public Health Research Institute, University of Montreal ; Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital Research Center, University of Montreal Affiliated Research Center, Montreal.
2
Hamilton Health Sciences Corporation, Hamilton, Ont.
3
Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton ; McCaig Institute for Bone and Joint Health, Calgary, Alta.

Abstract

in English, French

PURPOSE:

To evaluate the effects of prehabilitation (enhancing physical capacity before total hip or knee joint arthroplasty) on pain and physical function of adults with severe hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA).

METHODS:

Consecutive patients (n=650) from 2006 to 2008 with hip or knee OA awaiting total joint arthroplasty (TJA) attended a hospital outpatient clinic for a prehabilitation assessment. All participants completed self-report (Lower Extremity Functional Scale [LEFS] and visual analogue scale for pain [VAS]) and functional performance measures (self-paced walk [SPW], timed stair, and timed up-and-go [TUG] tests). A subset of 28 participants with severe disability participated in a structured outpatient prehabilitation programme. Between-group differences were assessed via independent t-tests; paired Student's t-tests and Wilcoxon signed rank tests were used to compare changes in pain and function following the prehabilitation programme.

RESULTS:

A total of 28 individuals (16 female) with mean age 67 (SD 10) years and BMI 33 (8) kg/m(2) awaiting TJA (10 hips, 18 knees) participated in a prehabilitation programme of 9 (6) weeks' duration. Relative to baseline, there was significant improvement in LEFS score (mean change 7.6; 95% CI, 1.7-13.5; p=0.013), SPW (mean change 0.17 m/s; 95% CI, 0.07-0.26; p=0.001), TUG (mean change 4.2 s; 95% CI, 2.0-6.4; p<0.001), and stair test performance (mean change 3.8 s [SD 14.6]; p=0.005) following prehabilitation.

CONCLUSION:

This study presents preliminary evidence that prehabilitation improves physical function even in the most severely compromised patients with OA awaiting TJA.

KEYWORDS:

arthroplasty; exercise; osteoarthritis; physical therapy specialty; rehabilitation

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