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Dev Cogn Neurosci. 2014 Apr;8:18-27. doi: 10.1016/j.dcn.2013.12.003. Epub 2013 Dec 18.

Girls' challenging social experiences in early adolescence predict neural response to rewards and depressive symptoms.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, 3811 O'Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, United States. Electronic address: casementmd@upmc.edu.
2
Department of Human Ecology and Center for Mind and Brain, University of California, Davis, 267 Cousteau Place, Davis, CA 95618, United States. Electronic address: aeguyer@ucdavis.edu.
3
Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, 3811 O'Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, United States. Electronic address: hipwellae@upmc.edu.
4
Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, 3811 O'Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, United States. Electronic address: mcaloonrl@upmc.edu.
5
Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, 3811 O'Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, United States. Electronic address: hoffmanna@upmc.edu.
6
Department of Psychology and Behavioral Neuroscience, University of Chicago, W415, MC 3077, 5841 South Maryland Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637, United States. Electronic address: kkeenan@yoda.bsd.uchicago.edu.
7
Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, 3811 O'Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, United States; Department of Psychology, University of Pittsburgh, 3811 O'Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, United States; Department of Pediatrics, University of Pittsburgh, 3811 O'Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, United States. Electronic address: forbese@upmc.edu.

Abstract

Developmental models of psychopathology posit that exposure to social stressors may confer risk for depression in adolescent girls by disrupting neural reward circuitry. The current study tested this hypothesis by examining the relationship between early adolescent social stressors and later neural reward processing and depressive symptoms. Participants were 120 girls from an ongoing longitudinal study of precursors to depression across adolescent development. Low parental warmth, peer victimization, and depressive symptoms were assessed when the girls were 11 and 12 years old, and participants completed a monetary reward guessing fMRI task and assessment of depressive symptoms at age 16. Results indicate that low parental warmth was associated with increased response to potential rewards in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), striatum, and amygdala, whereas peer victimization was associated with decreased response to potential rewards in the mPFC. Furthermore, concurrent depressive symptoms were associated with increased reward anticipation response in mPFC and striatal regions that were also associated with early adolescent psychosocial stressors, with mPFC and striatal response mediating the association between social stressors and depressive symptoms. These findings are consistent with developmental models that emphasize the adverse impact of early psychosocial stressors on neural reward processing and risk for depression in adolescence.

KEYWORDS:

Adolescence; Depression; Parental warmth; Peer victimization; Reward; fMRI

PMID:
24397999
PMCID:
PMC3960334
DOI:
10.1016/j.dcn.2013.12.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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