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J Clin Nurs. 2014 Oct;23(19-20):2980-9. doi: 10.1111/jocn.12528. Epub 2014 Jan 7.

Parental groups during the child's first year: an interview study of parents' experiences.

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1
Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, Bergen University College, Bergen, Norway.

Abstract

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES:

To highlight what was important to parents with respect to consultation groups at well-child clinics.

BACKGROUND:

Parents managing of their role as parents affect the child's health and are therefore an important priority for public health. Well-child clinics in Norway practise consultations in groups to support parents and to facilitate social network; however, few studies explore parents' perspective of this kind of groups.

DESIGN:

Grounded theory.

METHODS:

We used classical grounded theory with a generative and constant comparative approach. Data were collected through seven focus groups and two individual interviews with the parents of children aged 8-15 months.

RESULTS:

The parents were most concerned about how to achieve connection without accountability and how to obtain relevant health information. They managed this by 'multipositioning', encompassing the strategies of: (1) practising conditional openness, (2) seeking to belong, (3) awaiting initiative and (4) expecting balanced health information. The use of these strategies explains how they resolved their challenges.

CONCLUSION:

Parental groups seem to be popular and have great potential to establish a social network; however, underestimating the need for structure and continuity in the groups might cause this opportunity to be missed.

RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE:

Understanding parents' perspectives will be useful when planning strategies to strengthen parental groups at well-child clinics and that the engaged organisers will account for this need to ensure public health work of high quality and effectiveness for parents.

KEYWORDS:

grounded theory; health information seeking; infant; parenting; public health nurse; social support

PMID:
24393530
DOI:
10.1111/jocn.12528
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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