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Ethn Dis. 2013 Autumn;23(4):508-17.

Racial and ethnic minority participants in chronic disease self-management programs: findings from the Communities Putting Prevention to Work initiative.

Author information

1
Altarum Institute, USA. HKorda@aol.com
2
IMPAQ International, USA.
3
Altarum Institute, USA.
4
U.S. Administration for Community Living, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The Communities Putting Prevention to Work: Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) Initiative funded grantees in 45 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico to implement and expand delivery of CDSMP to older adults. We examine whether there are differences in the enrollment and completion rates of members of racial and ethnic minority groups and what sites have done to enhance their delivery of the CDSMP to such groups.

METHOD:

This study used a multi-method approach including: site visits to 6 states, telephone interviews with the 47 program grantees and delivery sites, review of program reports, and analysis of administrative data on participants, completers, workshops and leaders.

RESULTS:

Grantees served 89,861 participants, including 56.3% who self-identified as White, 17.3% as Black, 5.0% as other/multi-racial, 3.2% as Asian/Asian Americans, 1.4% as American Indian/Alaskans, .8% as Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islanders, and 16.0% individuals of unknown race. Overall, completion rates averaged 74.5%, with Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islanders completing workshops at a higher rate (90.6%) than other groups. Completion rates for participants aged > or = 75 were higher than for younger participants. Senior centers, health care organizations, and residential facilities served 63.1% of the participants.

CONCLUSIONS:

Grantees have successfully delivered CDSMP to racially and ethnically diverse participants in a range of settings. As the Administration for Community Living/Administration on Aging (ACL/AoA) grantees have demonstrated, CDSMP can be brought to scale by community organizations, partnerships and networks to reach diverse populations in diverse settings. The program can be a significant tool for addressing health disparities and empowering racial/ethnic minorities to take charge, promote better health and self-management of chronic conditions.

PMID:
24392616
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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