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PLoS One. 2013 Dec 31;8(12):e83540. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0083540. eCollection 2013.

Clinical significance of asthma clusters by longitudinal analysis in Korean asthma cohort.

Author information

1
Division of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Department of Internal Medicine, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
2
Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea.
3
Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
4
Department of Internal Medicine, Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon, Korea.
5
Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea.
6
Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, Ajou University, Suwon, Korea.
7
Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul, Korea.
8
Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Korea.
9
Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, Korea.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

We have previously identified four distinct groups of asthma patients in KOREAN cohorts using cluster analysis: (A) smoking asthma, (B) severe obstructive asthma, (C) early-onset atopic asthma, and (D) late-onset mild asthma.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

A longitudinal analysis of each cluster in a Korean adult asthma cohort was performed to investigate the clinical significance of asthma clusters over 12 months. Cluster A showed relatively high asthma control test (ACT) scores but relatively low FEV1 scores, despite a high percentage of systemic corticosteroid use. Cluster B had the lowest mean FEV1, ACT, and the quality of life questionnaire for adult Korean asthmatics (QLQAKA) scores throughout the year, even though the percentage of systemic corticosteroid use was the highest among the four clusters. Cluster C was ranked second in terms of FEV1, with the second lowest percentage of systemic corticosteroid use, and showed a marked improvement in subjective symptoms over time. Cluster D consistently showed the highest FEV1, the lowest systemic corticosteroid use, and had high ACT and QLQAKA scores.

CONCLUSION:

Our asthma clusters had clinical significance with consistency among clusters over 12 months. These distinctive phenotypes may be useful in classifying asthma in real practice.

PMID:
24391784
PMCID:
PMC3877049
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0083540
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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