Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Nat Neurosci. 2014 Feb;17(2):296-303. doi: 10.1038/nn.3600. Epub 2014 Jan 5.

Flies and humans share a motion estimation strategy that exploits natural scene statistics.

Author information

1
1] Department of Neurobiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA. [2] [3].
2
1] Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA. [2] [3].
3
1] Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA. [2] [3].
4
Department of Neurobiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA.
5
Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA.

Abstract

Sighted animals extract motion information from visual scenes by processing spatiotemporal patterns of light falling on the retina. The dominant models for motion estimation exploit intensity correlations only between pairs of points in space and time. Moving natural scenes, however, contain more complex correlations. We found that fly and human visual systems encode the combined direction and contrast polarity of moving edges using triple correlations that enhance motion estimation in natural environments. Both species extracted triple correlations with neural substrates tuned for light or dark edges, and sensitivity to specific triple correlations was retained even as light and dark edge motion signals were combined. Thus, both species separately process light and dark image contrasts to capture motion signatures that can improve estimation accuracy. This convergence argues that statistical structures in natural scenes have greatly affected visual processing, driving a common computational strategy over 500 million years of evolution.

PMID:
24390225
PMCID:
PMC3993001
DOI:
10.1038/nn.3600
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center