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J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis. 2014 Jul;23(6):1385-90. doi: 10.1016/j.jstrokecerebrovasdis.2013.11.016. Epub 2014 Jan 3.

The effectiveness of a stroke educational activity performed by a schoolteacher for junior high school students.

Author information

1
Department of Cerebrovascular Medicine, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center, Osaka, Japan.
2
Department of Cerebrovascular Medicine, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center, Osaka, Japan. Electronic address: cyokota@ncvc.go.jp.
3
Department of Preventive Medicine and Epidemiology, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center, Osaka, Japan.
4
Laboratory of Biomedical Sciences and Information Management, Research Institute, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center, Osaka, Japan.
5
Department of Information Governance, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center, Osaka, Japan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The purpose of this study was to determine whether our stroke education system can help junior high school students acquire stroke knowledge when performed by a schoolteacher.

METHODS:

A stroke neurologist gave a stroke lesson to 25 students (S group) and a schoolteacher through our stroke education system. After instruction, the schoolteacher performed the same lesson using the same education system to another 75 students (T group). Questionnaires on stroke knowledge were examined at baseline, immediately after the lesson (IL), and at 3 months after the lesson (3M). We analyzed the results of stroke knowledge assessment by linear mixed effects models adjusted for gender and class difference using the student number.

RESULTS:

We assessed 24 students in the S group and 72 students in the T group. There were no significant differences in the changes of predicted scores of symptoms and risk factors adjusted for gender, class difference, and each student knowledge level until 3M between the 2 groups. Correct answer rates for the meaning of the FAST (facial droop, arm weakness, speech disturbance, time to call 119) at IL were 92% in the S group and 72% in the T group, respectively. At 3M, they were 83% in the S group and 84% in the T group. The correct answer rates of FAST at 3M were not significantly different adjusted for group, gender, class difference, and correct answer rate at IL.

CONCLUSIONS:

A schoolteacher can conduct the FAST message lesson to junior high school students with a similar outcome as a stroke neurologist using our stroke education system.

KEYWORDS:

FAST; School-based intervention; online system; stroke enlightenment

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