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PM R. 2014 Aug;6(8):749-52. doi: 10.1016/j.pmrj.2013.12.010. Epub 2013 Dec 31.

Posttraumatic fat necrosis presenting as prepatellar loose bodies in an adolescent football player.

Author information

  • 1Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN(∗).
  • 2Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center, Rochester, MN(†).
  • 3Orthopedics, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center, Rochester, MN(‡).
  • 4Radiology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN(§).
  • 5Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Mayo Clinic, W14 Mayo Building, 200 1st Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905; Department of Radiology, and Department of Anatomy, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center, Rochester, MN(‖). Electronic address: smith.jay@mayo.edu.

Abstract

A 16-year-old high school football player presented with 4 months of anterior knee pain and small, mobile, prepatellar "lumps" after falling onto an opponent's cleat. He reported knee pain primarily during knee flexion and direct pressure during squatting and kneeling. Knee radiographs were unremarkable. Ultrasonography revealed multiple, freely mobile, subcutaneous nodules of variable size and echogenicity in the prepatellar region. Analysis of magnetic resonance imaging suggested possible fat necrosis but was nondiagnostic. The patient opted for surgical exploration, at which time multiple, opalescent subcutaneous nodules were removed. Pathology was consistent with encapsulated fat necrosis. After surgery, his symptoms resolved, and he returned to sports without restrictions.

Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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