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Dev Cell. 2014 Jan 13;28(1):56-69. doi: 10.1016/j.devcel.2013.11.024. Epub 2014 Jan 2.

Hox proteins mediate developmental and environmental control of autophagy.

Author information

1
CNRS, Aix Marseille Université, IBDML, UMR 7288, Campus de Luminy, Marseille, cedex 09, 13288, France; Department of Anatomy, Cell and Developmental Biology, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, 1117, Hungary. Electronic address: banreti7@gmail.com.
2
CNRS, Aix Marseille Université, IBDML, UMR 7288, Campus de Luminy, Marseille, cedex 09, 13288, France.
3
Department of Anatomy, Cell and Developmental Biology, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, 1117, Hungary.
4
CNRS, Aix Marseille Université, IBDML, UMR 7288, Campus de Luminy, Marseille, cedex 09, 13288, France. Electronic address: yacine.graba@univ-amu.fr.

Abstract

Hox genes encode evolutionarily conserved transcription factors, providing positional information used for differential morphogenesis along the anteroposterior axis. Here, we show that Drosophila Hox proteins are potent repressors of the autophagic process. In inhibiting autophagy, Hox proteins display no apparent paralog specificity and do not provide positional information. Instead, they impose temporality on developmental autophagy and act as effectors of environmental signals in starvation-induced autophagy. Further characterization establishes that temporality is controlled by Pontin, a facultative component of the Brahma chromatin remodeling complex, and that Hox proteins impact on autophagy by repressing the expression of core components of the autophagy machinery. Finally, the potential of central and posterior mouse Hox proteins to inhibit autophagy in Drosophila and in vertebrate COS-7 cells indicates that regulation of autophagy is an evolutionary conserved feature of Hox proteins.

PMID:
24389064
DOI:
10.1016/j.devcel.2013.11.024
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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