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Mech Ageing Dev. 2014 Mar-Apr;136-137:29-49. doi: 10.1016/j.mad.2013.12.007. Epub 2014 Jan 2.

Micronutrient-gene interactions related to inflammatory/immune response and antioxidant activity in ageing and inflammation. A systematic review.

Author information

1
Translation Center of Research in Nutrition and Ageing, Scientific and Technological Pole, Italian National Research Centres on Ageing (INRCA), Via Birarelli 8, 60121 Ancona, Italy. Electronic address: e.mocchegiani@inrca.it.
2
Translation Center of Research in Nutrition and Ageing, Scientific and Technological Pole, Italian National Research Centres on Ageing (INRCA), Via Birarelli 8, 60121 Ancona, Italy.
3
Department of Experimental Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine (DIMES) and Interdepartmental Centre "L. Galvani" (CIG), University of Bologna, Via San Giacomo, 12, 40126 Bologna, Italy.
4
National Hellenic Research Foundation, Institute of Biology, Medicinal Chemistry and Biotechnology, 48 Vas. Constantinou Ave., Athens 11635, Greece.
5
Department of Clinical and Experimental Biomedical Sciences, University of Florence, Viale Morgagni, 50, 50134 Florence, Italy.

Abstract

Recent longitudinal studies in dietary daily intake in human centenarians have shown that a satisfactory content of some micronutrients within the cells maintain several immune functions, a low grade of inflammation and preserve antioxidant activity. Micronutrients (zinc, copper, selenium) play a pivotal role in maintaining and reinforcing the performances of the immune and antioxidant systems as well as in affecting the complex network of the genes (nutrigenomic) with anti- and pro-inflammatory tasks. Genes of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and some key regulators of trace elements homeostasis, such as Metallothioneins (MT), are involved in the susceptibility to major geriatric disease/disorders. Moreover, the genetic inter-individual variability may affect the nutrients' absorption (nutrigenetic) with altered effects on inflammatory/immune response and antioxidant activity. The interaction between genetic factors and micronutrients (nutrigenomic and nutrigenetic approaches) may influence ageing and longevity because the micronutrients may become also toxic. This review reports the micronutrient-gene interactions in ageing and their impact on the healthy state with a focus on the method of protein-metal speciation analysis. The association between micronutrient-gene interactions and the protein-metal speciation analysis can give a complete picture for a personalized nutrient supplementation or chelation in order to reach healthy ageing and longevity.

KEYWORDS:

Ageing; Antioxidant activity; Immune system; Longevity; Zinc/copper/selenium–gene interactions

PMID:
24388876
DOI:
10.1016/j.mad.2013.12.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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