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J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2014 Feb;37(2):116-23. doi: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2013.11.004. Epub 2014 Jan 2.

Effect of chiropractic manipulation on vertical jump height in young female athletes with talocrural joint dysfunction: a single-blind randomized clinical pilot trial.

Author information

1
Registered Chiropractor in Private Practice, Scandinavian College of Chiropractic, Solna, Sweden.
2
Senior Researcher, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Research Unit for Studies of Integrative Health Care (NVS/OMV), Huddinge, Sweden. Electronic address: Tobias.sundberg@ki.se.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The main objective of this pilot study was to explore the effect of chiropractic high-velocity, low-amplitude (HVLA) manipulation on vertical jump height in young female athletes with talocrural joint dysfunction.

METHODS:

This was a randomized assessor-blind clinical pilot trial. Twenty-two female handball players with talocrural joint dysfunction were randomized to receive either HVLA manipulation (n = 11) or sham treatment (n = 11) once a week during a 3-week period. The main outcome was change in vertical jump height from baseline to follow-up within and between groups after 3 weeks.

RESULTS:

Nineteen athletes completed the study. After 3 weeks, the group receiving HVLA manipulation (n = 11) had a statistically significant mean (SD) improvement in vertical jump height of 1.07 (1.23) cm (P = .017). The sham treatment group (n = 8) improved their vertical jump height by 0.59 (2.03) cm (P = .436). The between groups' change was 0.47 cm (95% confidence interval, -1.31 to 2.26; P = .571) in favor of the group receiving HVLA manipulation. Blinding and sham procedures were feasible, and there were no reported adverse events.

CONCLUSION:

The results of this pilot study show that a larger-scale study is feasible. Preliminary results suggest that chiropractic HVLA manipulation may increase vertical jump height in young female athletes with talocrural joint dysfunction. However, the clinical result in favor of HVLA manipulation compared with sham treatment needs statistical confirmation in a larger randomized clinical trial.

KEYWORDS:

Ankle Joint; Athletes; Chiropractic; Manipulation; Randomized Controlled Trial

PMID:
24387886
DOI:
10.1016/j.jmpt.2013.11.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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