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PLoS One. 2013 Dec 30;8(12):e85507. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0085507. eCollection 2013.

The microbiome of the middle meatus in healthy adults.

Author information

1
Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Colorado, Aurora, Colorado, United States of America.
2
Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Colorado, Aurora, Colorado, United States of America.
3
Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado, United States of America.
4
Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Colorado, Aurora, Colorado, United States of America ; Microbiome Research Consortium, University of Colorado, Aurora, Colorado, United States of America.

Abstract

Rhinitis and rhinosinusitis are multifactorial disease processes in which bacteria may play a role either in infection or stimulation of the inflammatory process. Rhinosinusitis has been historically studied with culture-based techniques, which have implicated several common pathogens in disease states. More recently, the NIH Human Microbiome Project has examined the microbiome at a number of accessible body sites, and demonstrated differences among healthy and diseased patients. Recent DNA-based sinus studies have suggested that healthy sinuses are not sterile, as was previously believed, but the normal sinonasal microbiome has yet to be thoroughly examined. Middle meatus swab specimens were collected from 28 consecutive patients presenting with no signs or symptoms of rhinosinusitis. Bacterial colonization was assessed in these specimens using quantitative PCR and 16S rRNA pyrosequencing. All subjects were positive for bacterial colonization of the middle meatus. Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Propionibacterium acnes were the most prevalent and abundant microorganisms detected. Rich and diverse bacterial assemblages are present in the sinonasal cavity in the normal state, including opportunistic pathogens typically found in the nasopharynx. This work helps establish a baseline for understanding how the sinonasal microbiome may impact diseases of the upper airways.

PMID:
24386477
PMCID:
PMC3875580
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0085507
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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