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Arthroscopy. 2014 Jan;30(1):86-9. doi: 10.1016/j.arthro.2013.10.007.

Did the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons osteoarthritis guidelines miss the mark?

Author information

1
Center for Treatment Comparison and Integrative Analysis, Division of Rheumatology, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A.; Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A.; Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences, Tufts University, Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A.. Electronic address: rbannuru@tuftsmedicalcenter.org.
2
Center for Treatment Comparison and Integrative Analysis, Division of Rheumatology, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A.
3
Westchester Orthopaedic Associates, White Plains, New York, U.S.A.

Abstract

The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) 2013 guidelines for knee osteoarthritis recommended against the use of viscosupplementation for failing to meet the criterion of minimum clinically important improvement (MCII). However, the AAOS's methodology contained numerous flaws in obtaining, displaying, and interpreting MCII-based results. The current state of research on MCII allows it to be used only as a supplementary instrument, not a basis for clinical decision making. The AAOS guidelines should reflect this consideration in their recommendations to avoid condemning potentially viable treatments in the context of limited available alternatives.

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PMID:
24384274
DOI:
10.1016/j.arthro.2013.10.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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