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J Am Geriatr Soc. 2014 Jan;62(1):54-60. doi: 10.1111/jgs.12609. Epub 2014 Jan 2.

Behavioral treatment of insomnia: also effective for nocturia.

Author information

1
Division of Geriatrics and Gerontology, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To evaluate changes in self-reported nocturia in community-dwelling adults aged 60 and older who received behavioral treatment for chronic insomnia.

DESIGN:

Secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial of a behavioral intervention for sleep.

SETTING:

Academic medical center.

PARTICIPANTS:

Of the 79 enrollees, this analysis focused on 30 who, in addition to insomnia, also reported at least one nightly episode of waking up to void.

INTERVENTION:

The brief behavioral treatment of insomnia (BBTI) group (n = 14) received instructions on reducing time in bed and setting a regular sleep schedule. The information control (IC) group (n = 16) received printed materials. A nurse clinician delivered both interventions.

MEASUREMENTS:

Self-reported nocturnal awakenings to void assessed daily for 14 days at baseline and 4 weeks after the intervention. Participants who reported at least one episode of nocturia per night at baseline were included in this analysis.

RESULTS:

In individuals with nocturia at baseline, the total number of nocturnal voids over the 14-day assessment period decreased by 6.5 ± 4.8 in the BBTI group and increased by 1.3 ± 7.3 in the IC group (P = .04, effect size 0.82). After adjusting for baseline nocturia episodes, the difference remained significant (P = .05).

CONCLUSION:

In older adults with concurrent insomnia and nocturia, behavioral treatment directed solely at insomnia may also improve self-reported nocturia. Behavioral treatment of insomnia should be further investigated for its effect on nocturia in individuals with concurrent insomnia and nocturia.

KEYWORDS:

behavioral treatment; elderly; insomnia; nocturia

PMID:
24383406
PMCID:
PMC4055528
DOI:
10.1111/jgs.12609
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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