Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Int J Family Med. 2013;2013:603713. doi: 10.1155/2013/603713. Epub 2013 Dec 7.

Risk of Burnout in Danish GPs and Exploration of Factors Associated with Development of Burnout: A Two-Wave Panel Study.

Author information

1
Research Unit for General Practice and Research Centre for Cancer Diagnosis in Primary Care (CaP), Health, Aarhus University, Bartholins Allé 2, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

We assessed risk of burnout in GPs during a 7-year followup and examined whether (1) thoughts about changing medical specialty increased the risk of burnout and (2) burned out GPs had higher job turnover rates than burnout-free GPs.

METHODS:

In 2004 and 2012, all GPs in the county of Aarhus, Denmark, were invited to participate in a survey. Retirement status of physicians who participated in 2004 was obtained through the Registry of Health Providers in 2012.

RESULTS:

216 GPs completed both surveys. The risk of developing burnout during the 7-year followup was 13.2% (8.2-19.6%). GPs who in 2004 were burnout-free and reported that they would not select general practice as medical specialty again had a statistically significant increased risk of burnout in 2012 (OR = 4.5; 95% CI = 1.2-16.5; P = 0.023). Among GPs with burnout in 2004, 25.0% had withdrawn from general practice during followup compared to 28.8% of burnout-free GPs in 2004 (adj. OR = 0.99; 95% CI = 0.48-2.02; P = 0.975).

CONCLUSION:

The 7-year incidence of burnout was 13%. Thoughts about changing medical specialty were an important predictor of burnout. Burned out GPs had not higher job turnover rates than burnout-free GPs.

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Hindawi Limited Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center