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Prev Med. 2014 Apr;61:29-33. doi: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2013.12.026. Epub 2013 Dec 29.

HCV and HBV testing acceptability and knowledge among urban emergency department patients and pharmacy clients.

Author information

1
Department of Emergency Medicine, Jacobi Medical Center, Bronx, NY, USA; Department of Emergency Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA. Electronic address: Yvette.Calderon@nbhn.net.
2
Department of Emergency Medicine, Jacobi Medical Center, Bronx, NY, USA; Department of Emergency Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA.
3
Department of Emergency Medicine, Jacobi Medical Center, Bronx, NY, USA.
4
Internal Medicine, Jacobi Medical Center, Bronx, NY, USA; Internal Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Hepatitis C and hepatitis B are public health problems in the United States and remain largely undiagnosed. In response to the availability of rapid, point of care hepatitis tests, we assessed hepatitis knowledge and acceptability of hepatitis testing during an emergency department (ED) or pharmacy visit.

METHODS:

From June 2010 to May 2011, an anonymous prospective survey was administered to a convenience sample of New York City ED patients and pharmacy clients.

RESULTS:

The study population (N=2078) was 54% female, 36% Hispanic and 41% black. Mean age was 39, SD ± 15 years. The majority (72%;1480/2,2060) of the participants responded that they would get tested if free testing were offered, and 67% (1272/1912) of those responded that they would test for hepatitis B/C in conjunction with HIV. Participants who had previously tested for hepatitis had higher mean knowledge scores than those who had never tested. Pharmacy clients, those of black race, and those with higher mean knowledge scores would be more willing to accept hepatitis B/C testing if offered.

CONCLUSIONS:

Urban ED patients and pharmacy clients were receptive to hepatitis testing. Most individuals would elect to be tested for hepatitis with HIV, which raises the possibility of integrated testing.

KEYWORDS:

Emergency medicine; HIV; Hepatitis B; Hepatitis C; Knowledge; Pharmacy

PMID:
24382298
DOI:
10.1016/j.ypmed.2013.12.026
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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