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Int J Physiol Pathophysiol Pharmacol. 2013 Dec 15;5(4):194-202.

Therapeutic implications of curcumin in the prevention of diabetic retinopathy via modulation of anti-oxidant activity and genetic pathways.

Author information

1
Department of Optometry, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Qassim University Saudi Arabia.
2
Department of Medical Laboratories, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Qassim University Saudi Arabia ; Department of Pathology, Faculty of Vet. Medicine, Suez Canal University Ismailia, Egypt.
3
Department of Medical Laboratories, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Qassim University Saudi Arabia.

Abstract

Diabetic Retinopathy (DR) is one of the most common complications of diabetes mellitus that affects the blood vessels of the retina, leading to blindness. The current approach of treatment based on anti-inflammatory, anti-angiogenesis drugs and laser photocoagulation are effective but also shows adverse affect in retinal tissues and that can even worsen the visual abilities. Thus, a safe and effective mode of treatment is needed to control or delaying the DR. Based on the earlier evidence of the potentiality of natural products as anti-oxidants, anti-diabetic and antitumor, medicinal plants may constitute a good therapeutic approach in the prevention of DR. Curcumin, constituents of dietary spice turmeric, has been observed to have therapeutic potential in the inhibition or slow down progression of DR. In this review, we summarize the therapeutic potentiality of curcumin in the delaying the DR through antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, inhibition of Vascular Endothelial Growth and nuclear transcription factors. The strength of involvement of curcumin in the modulation of genes action creates a strong optimism towards novel therapeutic strategy of diabetic retinopathy and important mainstay in the management of diabetes and its complications DR.

KEYWORDS:

Medicinal plants; VEGF and diabetic retinopathy; curcumin

PMID:
24379904
PMCID:
PMC3867697

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