Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Front Microbiol. 2013 Dec 16;4:375. doi: 10.3389/fmicb.2013.00375.

Environmental reservoirs and mechanisms of persistence of Vibrio cholerae.

Author information

1
Centre for Marine Bio-Innovation, School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Science, University of New South Wales Sydney, NSW, Australia.
2
Centre for Marine Bio-Innovation, School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Science, University of New South Wales Sydney, NSW, Australia ; Advanced Environmental Biotechnology Centre, Nanyang Environment and Water Research Institute, School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University Singapore, Singapore.
3
The Singapore Centre on Environmental Life Sciences Engineering, Nanyang Technological University Singapore, Singapore.

Abstract

It is now well accepted that Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the water-borne disease cholera, is acquired from environmental sources where it persists between outbreaks of the disease. Recent advances in molecular technology have demonstrated that this bacterium can be detected in areas where it has not previously been isolated, indicating a much broader, global distribution of this bacterium outside of endemic regions. The environmental persistence of V. cholerae in the aquatic environment can be attributed to multiple intra- and interspecific strategies such as responsive gene regulation and biofilm formation on biotic and abiotic surfaces, as well as interactions with a multitude of other organisms. This review will discuss some of the mechanisms that enable the persistence of this bacterium in the environment. In particular, we will discuss how V. cholerae can survive stressors such as starvation, temperature, and salinity fluctuations as well as how the organism persists under constant predation by heterotrophic protists.

KEYWORDS:

biofilms; chitin; predation; protozoa; starvation adaptation; stress; viable but non-culturable; zooplankton

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Frontiers Media SA Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center