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Med Eng Phys. 2014 Jun;36(6):715-20. doi: 10.1016/j.medengphy.2013.12.004. Epub 2013 Dec 28.

Comparison of dental implant stabilities by impact response and resonance frequencies using artificial bone.

Author information

  • 1Interdisciplinary Program in Radiation, Applied Life Science Major, College of Medicine, BK21, and Dental Research Institute, Seoul National University, Republic of Korea.
  • 2Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, BK21, and Dental Research Institute, School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Republic of Korea.
  • 3Department of Periodontology and Dental Research Institute, School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: periopf@snu.ac.kr.
  • 4Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, BK21, and Dental Research Institute, School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: wjyi@snu.ac.kr.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

We compared implant stability as determined by the peak frequency from the impact response with the implant stability quotient (ISQ) by resonance frequency analysis (RFA) in various artificial bone conditions. The clinical bone conditions were simulated using an artificial bone material with different cortical thicknesses and trabecular densities.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

The artificial bone material was solid, rigid polyurethane. The polyurethane foam of 0.8g/cm(3) density was used for the cortical bone layer, and that of 0.08, 0.16, 0.24, 0.32, and 0.48g/cm(3) densities for the trabecular bone layer. The cortical bone material of 4 different thicknesses (1.4, 1.6, 1.8, and 2.0mm) was attached to the trabecular bone with varying density. Two types of dental implants (10 and 13mm lengths of 4.0mm diameter) were placed into the artificial bone blocks. An inductive sensor was used to measure the vibration caused by tapping the adapter-implant assembly. The peak frequency of the power spectrum of the impact response was used as the criterion for implant stability. The ISQ value was also measured for the same conditions.

RESULTS:

The stability, as measured by peak frequency (SPF) and ISQ value, increased as the trabecular density and the cortical density increased in linear regression analysis. The SPF and ISQ values were highly correlated with each other when the trabecular bone density and cortical bone thickness changed (Pearson correlation=0.90, p<0.01). The linear regression of the SPF with the cortical bone thickness showed higher goodness of fit (R(2) measure) than the ISQ value with the cortical bone thickness. The SPF could differentiate implantation conditions as many as the ISQ value when the trabecular bone density and the cortical density changed. However, the ISQ value was not consistent with the general stability tendency in some conditions.

CONCLUSION:

The SPF showed better consistency and differentiability with implant stability than the ISQ value by resonance frequency analysis in the various implantation conditions.

KEYWORDS:

Impact response; Implant stability; Implant stability quotient; Peak frequency from power spectrum; Resonance frequency analysis

PMID:
24378382
DOI:
10.1016/j.medengphy.2013.12.004
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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