Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Clin Psychol Sci. 2014 Jan;2(1). doi: 10.1177/2167702613496243.

Childhood Adversity and Cumulative Life Stress: Risk Factors for Cancer-Related Fatigue.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles ; Cousins Center for Psychoneuroimmunology and Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles.
2
Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles.
3
Cousins Center for Psychoneuroimmunology and Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles.

Abstract

Fatigue is a common symptom in healthy and clinical populations, including cancer survivors. However, risk factors for cancer-related fatigue have not been identified. On the basis of research linking stress with other fatigue-related disorders, we tested the hypothesis that stress exposure during childhood and throughout the life span would be associated with fatigue in breast cancer survivors. Stress exposure was assessed using the Stress and Adversity Inventory, a novel computer-based instrument that assesses for 96 types of acute and chronic stressors that may affect health. Results showed that breast cancer survivors with persistent fatigue reported significantly higher levels of cumulative lifetime stress exposure, including more stressful experiences in childhood and in adulthood, compared to a control group of nonfatigued survivors. These findings identify a novel risk factor for fatigue in the growing population of cancer survivors and suggest targets for treatment.

KEYWORDS:

breast cancer; child trauma; fatigue; health; stressful life events

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center