Format

Send to

Choose Destination
PLoS One. 2013 Dec 23;8(12):e82770. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0082770. eCollection 2013.

Exome sequencing identifies early gastric carcinoma as an early stage of advanced gastric cancer.

Author information

1
Department of Pathology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea ; Department of Pathology, Sanggye Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
2
Department of Pathology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea ; Samsung Advanced Institute for Health Sciences & Technology, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
3
Department of Pathology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
4
Oncology Research Unit, Pfizer Inc., San Diego, California, United States of America.
5
Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology-Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
6
Department of Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
7
Biostatistics Unit, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, Korea.

Abstract

Gastric carcinoma is one of the major causes of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Early detection and treatment leads to an excellent prognosis in patients with early gastric cancer (EGC), whereas the prognosis of patients with advanced gastric cancer (AGC) remains poor. It is unclear whether EGCs and AGCs are distinct entities or whether EGCs are the beginning stages of AGCs. We performed whole exome sequencing of four samples from patients with EGC and compared the results with those from AGCs. In both EGCs and AGCs, a total of 268 genes were commonly mutated and independent mutations were additionally found in EGCs (516 genes) and AGCs (3104 genes). A higher frequency of C>G transitions was observed in intestinal-type compared to diffuse-type carcinomas (P = 0.010). The DYRK3, GPR116, MCM10, PCDH17, PCDHB1, RDH5 and UNC5C genes are recurrently mutated in EGCs and may be involved in early carcinogenesis.

PMID:
24376576
PMCID:
PMC3871845
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0082770
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Public Library of Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center